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Citing Sources: Chicago Style

We are transitioning to APA 7th ed. Check with your professor to see which APA edition they require.

What is it?

Chicago Manual of Style is another citation method that began in the 1890s as a single sheet of typographic fundamentals drawn up by a University of Chicago Press proofreader. It has expanded and is used worldwide.

LLC Resources

Chicago Citation Style Links

Chicago Manual of Style - The official website of the Chicago Manual of Style, includes a quick reference citation guide.

Chicago Manual of Style Frequently Asked Questions  - The frequently asked questions (FAQ) page for the Chicago Manual of Style.

Chicago Manual of Style from Purdue University - A guide to formatting your paper using the Chicago Manual of Style, including details on general formats and in-depth citation examples.

Chicago Citation Style: General Guidelines

The Chicago Citation Style is unique in that it gives students a choice between two styles: the notes/bibliography style (most commonly associated with Chicago Style), or the author/date (in-text) style. For a more detailed review of both styles please check the helpful links above.

 Notes/Bibilography Style

When citing using this style, students insert a note at the bottom of the page with the citation information along with a corresponding citation in a bibliography at the end of their paper.

Example for a book with one author:

The end note will read:

1. Author First and Last Name, Title of Book (City: Publisher, Year of Publication), page number.

1. Heather Pierce, Persausive Proposals and Presentations: 24 Lessons for Writing Winners (Toronto: McGraw-Hill, 2005), 2-5.

The corresponding bibliographic citation will read:

Author Last Name, First Name. Title of Book. City: Publisher, Year of Publication.

Pierce, Heather. Persuasive Proposals and Presentations: 24 Lessons for Writing Winners. Toronto: McGraw-Hill, 2005.

Author/Date Style

When citing using this style, students cite in-text along with a corresponding bibliographic citation.

Example for a book with one author:

The in-text citation will read:

(Author Last Name Year of Publication, page number)

(Pierce 2005, 2-5)

The corresponding bibliographic citation will read:

Author Last Name, First Name. Year of Publication. Title. City: Publisher.

Pierce, Heather. 2005. Persuasive Proposals and Presentations: 24 Lessons for Writing Winners. Toronto: McGraw-Hill.

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